Explore other IDC events

IDC Qatar CIO Summit 2023

Enabling the Digital Economy's Leaders

In 2023, we are going further, together!
Join us for the 4th Edition.

The digital economy continues to expand in scale and sophistication at an unprecedented rate, driving the transformation of citizen, customer, and employee experiences and the rise of digitally enabled services such as remote healthcare, distance learning, remote work, and mobile banking.
Overview
Hot on the heels of hosting the FIFA 2022 World Cup, Qatar has seen the implementation of unprecedented technological innovations within the country, ranging from the enablement of cloud operational excellence and development of agile infrastructure to initiatives aimed at supporting application modernization, process automation, and security.

The result has been the emergence of new digital business models and ecosystem partnerships that, post FIFA World Cup 2022, will serve as a catalyst for driving Qatar’s digital economy and expanding its ICT ecosystem, ideally positioning it to attract investments in emerging industries, spur innovation, and showcase itself as a digital-first country.

Strong leadership, an appetite for innovation, and a sound strategy for addressing regulations are key to driving Qatar’s future digital agenda, disrupting supply chains across numerous industries, and fueling growth in areas such as ecommerce, direct-to-consumer services, digital payments, and cloud kitchens. With the metaverse and Web3 paradigms on the horizon, further disruption is expected to individual, enterprise, and industrial digital experiences.

The IDC Qatar CIO Summit 2023 will bring together the region's foremost IT and telecom leaders, digital government pioneers, and industry thought leaders. Hosting some of the region's most prominent ICT decision makers, the event will explore today's unprecedented rate of technological innovation and its role in creating a more competitive, diversified, and productive digital economy that is positively impacting citizens, customers, employees, and operations alike. It will also examine the key challenges that need to be overcome and present proven best practices and strategies for driving future success.
Why Attend?
• Receive critical insights from leading industry experts
• Discover solutions to pressing business challenges
• Get hands on with the industry's latest innovations
• Interact with the brands and specialists on your short list
• Engage in workshop-based technology discussions
• Participate in dedicated one-to-one meetings
• Share knowledge and network with your peers
• Take part in a series of fun, exciting, and memorable activities

Delegate Journey

Don't miss out on an extraordinary and unparalleled experience at the IDC Qatar CIO Summit 2023

Key Topics

Impact of Sustainability on Technology Vendor

Application Modernization strategies

Effective Hybrid Cloud Deployment

Developing an AIOps strategy and practices

Full stack Observability

Leveraging Low Code / No Code platforms

Orchestrating Digital Infrastructure for hybrid environments

Charting a Data-driven digital strategy

Intelligent automation

Predictive analytics strategies

Zero Trust security approaches

Cybersecurity Policies & Regulations and Compliance

5G impact – network architectures, market strategies and use cases

2022 Event Highlights

Agenda

Filter Topics

Wednesday November 15, 2023
8:00

Registration & Networking

8:55

Opening Act

9:00

IDC Welcome Address

9:05

IDC Keynote: Strategies for the CIO and Enterprise Innovation in the Age of AI Everywhere

9:30

Beating the Odds: Overcoming OT Security Challenges

9:45

Q&A (Ask Questions, Rate Sessions & Stand a Chance to Win Raffle Prizes)

9:50

Unified AI for Customer Experience

10:05

Q&A (Ask Questions, Rate Sessions & Stand a Chance to Win Raffle Prizes)

10:10

Reimagine and transform your applications with generative AI

10:25

Q&A (Ask Questions, Rate Sessions & Stand a Chance to Win Raffle Prizes)

10:30

Why is Generative AI Critical for Enterprise and Governmental Entities, and Why Should You Have an AI Strategy?

10:45

Tea/ Coffee & Networking Break

11:15

Platinum Partner Tracks (Parallel Sessions)

12:25

Tea/ Coffee & Networking Break

12:55

Evolution of the Human Species

13:15

Technology Focus Group Tracks (Parallel Sessions)

13:50

For The CIO - By The CIO Tracks (Parallel Sessions)

14:20

Summary & Close

14:25

Mega Raffle Winner Announcement (Apple iPhone 14)

14:30

Lunch

Speakers

Ranjit Rajan

Vice President, Research (META), IDC

Steven Frantzen

Senior Vice President & Regional Managing Director (EMEA), IDC

Anand GP

OT Security Technical Engineer, TXOne Networks

Roland Boulos

Director of Solutions Consulting, Sprinklr

Mohamed Afifi

Head of Sales - GCC and Levant, Worldwide Public Sector, AWS

Ashley Woodbridge

Chief Technology Officer for MEA, Lenovo Infrastructure Solutions Group

John Mankarios

Vice President of IT, QInvest

Amr Metwally

Assistant Executive Director, Itqan Clinical Simulation & Innovation Center, Hamad Medical Corporation

Bilal Issa

Manager, Technical, GC & Support Lead, MENA & Gulf & Emerging Markets, Trend Micro

Adrian Pickering

Regional General Manager MENA, Red Hat

Layale Hachem

Senior Solutions Engineer, BeyondTrust

Pedro Jacinto

MEA SE Senior Manager, Dynatrace

Poovana Kokalera

Regional Sales Director, GCC, Verint

Iheb Marzougui

Lead Solution Engineer, VMware

Daoud Abou Diab

Regional Channel Lead, NetApp

Neil Harbisson

The World’s First Officially Recognized Human “Cyborg”

Jyoti Lalchandani

Group Vice President & Regional Managing Director (META), IDC

Firas Georges Khalil

IT Director, Baladna Food Industries

Talal Al-Saif

Regional Executive Director (Central Gulf & Egypt), Nutanix

Mohamed ElShanawany

Cloud Infrastructure & Software Sales Leader (MEA), Cisco

Ammar Fayoumi

Senior Solutions Engineer, Cloudera

Ahmad Chehime

Cyber Security Specialist, Cisco

Abdulrahman Hassan

Head of IT Operation, Infrastructure, and Security, Qatar Free Zones Authority

Dr. Ali Al Sanousi

Executive Director, Clinical Information Systems, Hamad Medical Corporation

Dr. Joseph George

Group Chief Digital and Information Officer (CDIO), Doha Bank

Abdulsalam Al Yafei

ISIT and Engineering Group Manager, Qatalum

Justin Kenny

Chief Operating Officer, CQUR Bank

Elyas Zyoud

Vice President of IT Applications, QInvest

Jeffrey Kersting

Director of Innovation and Technology, American School of Doha

Muhammad Qais

Senior Manager BCM, Cyber, IT & Digital Risk, Commercial Bank of Qatar

Anoof Asker

Head of IT, Lesha Bank

View All Speakers

Partners

Summit Partner
Summit Partner
Summit Partner
Summit Partner
Platinum Partner
Platinum Partner
Platinum Partner
Platinum Partner
Platinum Partner
Platinum Partner
Platinum Partner
Technology Focus Group Partner
Technology Focus Group Partner
Technology Focus Group Partner
Exhibit Partner
Exhibit Partner
Exhibit Partner
Exhibit Partner
Exhibit Partner
Exhibit Partner
Exhibit Partner
Exhibit Partner
Exhibit Partner
Exhibit Partner
Health Partner
Media Partner
Media Partner
Media Partner
Media Partner

Photo Gallery

Venue

Grand Hyatt Doha Hotel & Villas
Pearl Blvd, Doha

Knowledge Hub

Analyst Spotlight
Cloud Overspend and the Role of CloudOps and FinOps

Matt Eastwood,
Senior Vice President, Worldwide Research, IDC


Over the past few years, IDC has seen investments in cloud grow rapidly as enterprises build their digital footprints. In many cases, this growth has occurred without the proper governance necessary to ensure resources are optimized appropriately. And the impact on budgets has been significant, with cloud now representing 35-40% of a typical IT budget. Additionally, the typical enterprise is reporting that their cloud overspend can be upwards of 25-35% today. Customers are clearly struggling to understand how to best optimize cloud spend for architectural and business benefit while also allocating cloud costs to the correct team.

Analyst Spotlight
Cloud Overspend and the Role of CloudOps and FinOps

Matt Eastwood,
Senior Vice President, Worldwide Research, IDC


Over the past few years, IDC has seen investments in cloud grow rapidly as enterprises build their digital footprints. In many cases, this growth has occurred without the proper governance necessary to ensure resources are optimized appropriately. And the impact on budgets has been significant, with cloud now representing 35-40% of a typical IT budget. Additionally, the typical enterprise is reporting that their cloud overspend can be upwards of 25-35% today. Customers are clearly struggling to understand how to best optimize cloud spend for architectural and business benefit while also allocating cloud costs to the correct team.

One of the ways that enterprise IT customers are tackling this challenge is through the implementation of CloudOps and FinOps. CloudOps is the practice of optimizing and managing the use of cloud resources, while FinOps is the practice of managing financial aspects of cloud operations. Together, these practices allow customers to better understand their cloud usage and costs, and to identify areas where they can reduce expenses effectively.

For example, by using CloudOps tools, customers can monitor and adjust their usage of resources such as storage and computing to ensure they are only paying for what they need. Additionally, FinOps techniques such as forecasting and budgeting can help customers plan and control their spending, preventing unexpected or unnecessary cloud charges.

As a result of these efforts, many enterprise IT customers are seeing significant reductions in their cloud expenditures and can more effectively allocate their IT budgets to other areas of the business. This can mean the difference between a project being viable or not. It also allows these users to have a better understanding of what they pay for and predict future costs, which can help them avoid financial surprises and make more informed decisions. And as many organizations deal with financial headwinds in the market, the time to implement or augment internal CloudOps and FinOps functions is now.

Analyst Spotlight
A New Approach to Security in the Post-Pandemic World

Frank Dickson,
Group Vice President, Security & Trust, IDC


As we enter 2023, we can finally, for the most part, put reactionary moves due to COVID-19 behind us as the disease moves from a pandemic to an endemic part of daily life. We have accepted that digital transformation moved at a feverish pace, transitioning our enterprises to digital first years before we anticipated. The possibilities of remote work gave way to the reality that hybrid work is here to stay. These are truths that we have accepted.

Analyst Spotlight
A New Approach to Security in the Post-Pandemic World

Frank Dickson,
Group Vice President, Security & Trust, IDC


As we enter 2023, we can finally, for the most part, put reactionary moves due to COVID-19 behind us as the disease moves from a pandemic to an endemic part of daily life. We have accepted that digital transformation moved at a feverish pace, transitioning our enterprises to digital first years before we anticipated. The possibilities of remote work gave way to the reality that hybrid work is here to stay. These are truths that we have accepted.

The economic headwinds we are experiencing have re-energized a trend that was muted by the pandemic. The C-suite appreciates the value and importance of security both now and into the future. C-level executives are actively planning continued investments in security to ensure the viability of their enterprises. However, C-level executives are growing tired of the continually growing financial appetite of security and are looking to reduce spending when and where possible. They are demanding accountability for the spend; in essence, they are looking for secure outcomes that are measurable and meaningful.

The result of this security confluence is a migration of approaches. The breach detection mindset of the past is giving way to a view that positions security as a way of improving an organization's cyber-risk posture, a posture that is tightly coupled with the goals of the organization and decreasing business risk. In its 2023 Future of Trust FutureScape, IDC predicted that by 2025, 45% of CEOs, fatigued by security spending without predictable ROI, will demand security metrics and results measurement to assess and validate investments made in their security program.

The IDC Middle East CIO Summit 2023 will look to address security in this new reality. We will help guide you in working with the CEO and boards of directors as we transition to delivering secure outcomes and a trusted organization to our executive constituencies.

Analyst Spotlight
Thriving in the Digital-First Economy

Ranjit Rajan,
Vice President, Research (META), IDC


The pandemic-driven pivot to digital-first strategies by organizations across the Middle East continues well after the pandemic has subsided. Indeed, many leading organizations are now making the transition from enabling digital transformation to actually running a digital business.

Analyst Spotlight
Thriving in the Digital-First Economy

Ranjit Rajan,
Vice President, Research (META), IDC


The pandemic-driven pivot to digital-first strategies by organizations across the Middle East continues well after the pandemic has subsided. Indeed, many leading organizations are now making the transition from enabling digital transformation to actually running a digital business.

In line with this shift, they are increasingly focused on deriving a larger share of revenues from digital products, services, channels, and platforms, with 50% of the CIOs surveyed by IDC across the Middle East saying this is now a major priority for their organizations.

The same survey revealed that 70% of Middle East CIOs will be prioritizing the digitalization of operations (process automation, reengineering, and productivity improvements) over the next 12-18 months, while more than half will also be focused on delivering insights at scale across their organizations by building capabilities in data and enterprise intelligence.

The region will continue to face several headwinds throughout 2023, including volatile demand, high inflation, interest rate hikes, supply chain uncertainties, and currency fluctuations. In order to navigate these storms of disruption, organizations will need to invest in strengthening their digital resiliency so they are better positioned to not only survive but thrive in new market environments as conditions continue to change.

Giga/Mega projects that envision futuristic, highly digitalized cities and communities — such as NEOM in Saudi Arabia — will provide a blueprint for accelerated digitalization across the region in 2023 and beyond. Such projects will set the pace as they develop greenfield digital infrastructure and platforms, leveraging advanced technologies like AI/ML, IoT, edge, and 5G to create innovative tech-enabled use cases and customer experiences.

The rise of the digital economy and the emergence of digital-native firms in segments such as fintech, ecommerce, D2C (direct to consumer), aggrotech, and edtech, among others, have accelerated the disruption of supply chains in several industries, driving the development of new business models, digitally augmented customer experiences, and automated operations.

At the same time, governments across the Middle East have launched numerous strategies and policies to support the growth of the digital economy, with a focus on developing the infrastructure, innovation platforms, skills, and regulations required to support the expansion of digital businesses.

In order to thrive in this new world, a digital-first mindset is essential, coupled with a vision to build a data-driven organization that is ingrained with a culture of innovation. Leveraging cloud as a foundational platform, developing a data and intelligence plane powered by AI and advanced analytics, and enabling ubiquitous, consumption-based digital infrastructure will all become critical technology priorities.

Analyst Spotlight
The Three Core Pillars of Efficient Digital Infrastructure

Shahin Hashim,
Associate Research Director, IDC


Pandemic-induced transformation has enabled governments and enterprises across all industries to deliver their products and services through digital channels. The sheer pace of this transformation has been a once-in-a-lifetime experience worth living through. As we move forward into 2023, the digital world has become the norm for most industries and organizations.

Analyst Spotlight
The Three Core Pillars of Efficient Digital Infrastructure

Shahin Hashim,
Associate Research Director, IDC


Pandemic-induced transformation has enabled governments and enterprises across all industries to deliver their products and services through digital channels. The sheer pace of this transformation has been a once-in-a-lifetime experience worth living through. As we move forward into 2023, the digital world has become the norm for most industries and organizations. This requires them to constantly innovate and improve their digital offerings to meet changing customer expectations, making a digital-only approach the default strategy for many. Indeed, three out of five UAE organizations surveyed by IDC rank the need to digitalize their operations as their utmost digital priority.

The implementation of highly responsive, resilient, and agile infrastructure is the foundation for any digital-first/only organization. IDC defines this as digital infrastructure, and our Future of Digital Infrastructure Framework helps technology suppliers to position their infrastructure products and services. It also assists technology buyers in defining their road maps for infrastructure transformation, enabling them to attain their ultimate digital infrastructure goals.

The framework is built around three core pillars:

Cloud-Native Technologies: This refers to any modern network, compute, and storage infrastructure, as well as software solutions and technologies delivered at cloud scale and with cloud attributes. These technologies enable frictionless governance, data management and mobility, and security compliance for enterprise workloads across the edge, core, and cloud, thus proactively preparing enterprises to face the interconnected uncertainties of the new world order.

Autonomous Operations: This is a model that allows organizations to run their infrastructure services in a highly automated and self-sufficient manner. This enables more efficient and reliable operations, freeing up resources and enhancing the overall customer experience. To achieve the most advanced level of autonomous operations, organizations can use a combination of modern programmable infrastructure with an API-enabled automation control plane coupled with a suite of cloud-native tools such as full stack observability, intelligent monitoring, asset management, configuration management, application performance management, and end-user experience management. Such an API-driven control plane enables DevOps teams to increase their developer velocity. Additionally, the IT service management function can be enhanced by adopting a proactive approach using AIOps augmented with AI/ML models, helping to significantly reduce the time to detect, respond to, and resolve incidents.

Ubiquitous Consumption: This refers to the utilization of digital infrastructure building blocks based on business objectives, regardless of the location of consumption or the method of delivery. This can include the consumption of resources at the edge, core, or cloud, as well as whether they are shared or dedicated. Essentially, it is about being able to consume the necessary digital resources in a flexible and adaptable manner so that they can be used to achieve desired business outcomes.

The future of digital infrastructure is an exciting one, and it will be interesting to see how organizations continue to leverage these developments to drive their digital-only journeys.

Partner Spotlight
How Companies Can Defend Against Business Email Compromise

Gopan Sivasankaran,
META General Manager, Secureworks


In 2022, across our emergency incident response engagements, we observed a significant rise in business email compromise (BEC) attacks, making it a preferred tactic for financially motivated cybercriminals.

Partner Spotlight
How Companies Can Defend Against Business Email Compromise

Gopan Sivasankaran,
META General Manager, Secureworks


In 2022, across our emergency incident response engagements, we observed a significant rise in business email compromise (BEC) attacks, making it a preferred tactic for financially motivated cybercriminals.

Hackers are opportunistic and often financially motivated, looking to make the most profit from the least effort. And tools like BEC allow cybercriminals to target multiple organizations and individuals simultaneously.

Understanding business email compromise

Our incident response engagements have identified two common methods used to steal money with BEC tactics: email chain injection and C-level fraud.

In email chain injection, the threat actor intercepts a payment-related email chain, impersonates the compromised account owner, and requests changes to payment information.

Meanwhile, C-level fraud involves the compromise of an executive’s email account, with the threat actor posing as the executive to instruct finance or accounting staff to transfer funds to a specified bank account, often creating a sense of urgency.

Business email compromise attacks often start with phishing emails that trick recipients into visiting fake login pages, enabling threat actors to steal their credentials. As such, it’s crucial that organizations look at what controls they need to have in place to help protect employees from inadvertently responding to these threats.

Security controls against BEC

From a technical standpoint, there are controls that organizations can implement to make it harder for employees to access these malicious websites.

One effective measure is using a web filter that blocks known malicious sites, newly created sites, and those without reputation scores. Running alongside this, tools in mail security solutions can defang or redirect phishing emails that contain malicious hyperlinks embedded within them.

Multifactor authentication (MFA) is highly effective in limiting the ability of threat actors to misuse credentials that do get compromised. MFA safeguards against credential-based attacks on network perimeters, such as remote desktop protocol and virtual private networks.

Another approach is geo-blocking, which restricts logins from countries where users are typically not located. Disabling legacy authentication methods, such as IMAP and POP, further reduces the risk of unauthorized access.

Of course, cybercriminals also try to get around MFA controls. Our incident responders have observed an emerging tactic known as “MFA bombing,” where threat actors use a series of MFA prompts to manipulate targeted users into granting access.

To counter this, organizations can require manual entry of MFA codes, completion of numeric challenge-response prompts, and provide additional informative prompts, such as displaying a map indicating the origin of the request.

Educating users to verify the request’s origin and location further enhances the organization’s security posture. By implementing these measures, businesses can strengthen their defense against business email compromise attacks and safeguard their sensitive information.

Working for a secure business culture

From a human perspective there are techniques and business processes that can be rolled out to mitigate user-related security risks. Security training is crucial in educating employees about the risks of BEC and how it impacts the organization.

Employees should be able to identify the warning signs of BEC attacks, verify payment or account changes through trusted communication channels, and report suspicious behavior to the appropriate business units.

Organizational culture plays a fundamental role in security. Employees should be encouraged to challenge non-standard requests (e.g., payment and account changes).

Adopting a “trust but verify” mindset towards emails, chat messages, or phone calls where even slight deviations from normal operations can raise red flags and protect the organization from falling victim to BEC attacks.

Employees should feel safe to question and report concerns — as well as mistakes. It’s better for an employee to rapidly and fully report that they may have fallen victim to one of these scams early, so that action may be taken to prevent fraud, rather than hide it and hope for the best.

By implementing controls such as the “two-person” rule, where a second employee reviews and verifies payment modifications, and requiring telephonic/in-person verification of requested changes, organizations can detect and prevent BEC attempts. These controls have proven effective in preventing substantial financial losses in real-world incidents.

Building security into the business

Ultimately, to mitigate the risks posed by BEC attacks, organizations need to raise awareness and build security into their business processes.

The motivation for threat actors to continue launching BEC attacks has never been greater than it is now. Organizations must recognize that email security controls alone are not completely effective at mitigating threats.

Threat actors will target every process that requires trust.

In the fight against BEC attacks, having solid technical controls in place will support employees, who are ultimately the organization's last line of defense. Equipping them with the necessary training, resources, and support is paramount to enhancing their ability to detect and thwart such attacks effectively.

Partner Spotlight
Empowering Business Users Through Low-Code Capabilities

Moussalam Dalati,
General Manager, Liferay Middle East and Africa


In today’s highly dynamic and competitive marketplace, businesses need to adapt in order to succeed — they must respond quickly to new market demands, adjust internal processes, and optimize operations. Low-code capabilities can play a significant role in helping organizations stay ahead of the competition.

Partner Spotlight
Empowering Business Users Through Low-Code Capabilities

Moussalam Dalati,
General Manager, Liferay Middle East and Africa


In today’s highly dynamic and competitive marketplace, businesses need to adapt in order to succeed — they must respond quickly to new market demands, adjust internal processes, and optimize operations. Low-code capabilities can play a significant role in helping organizations stay ahead of the competition.

The Benefits of Low-Code Solutions

Software solutions like digital experience platforms (DXPs) offer low-code functionalities that enable business users to build, deliver, and manage their own applications without specialized IT resources. Thanks to prebuilt components and templates, users can create custom applications with drag-and-drop interfaces and visual workflows, reducing or even removing the need for coding skills. This capability empowers users to take control of their own processes and make changes as needed.

Here are three major benefits of low-code capabilities:

1. Build, Deliver, and Manage Your Own Applications

Typically, traditional software development cycles can take weeks or months to deliver a new application because they require extensive coding, testing, and deployment procedures. However, low-code-enabled DXPs like Liferay can deliver new applications much faster through an accessible and visual approach to application development that is more user friendly than traditional coding methods.

2. Streamline Business Processes with Seamless Integration

Low-code platforms can help overcome the challenge of disconnectedness by enabling business users to build applications that integrate seamlessly with existing systems. With low-code functionality, it is possible to connect to different data sources and systems through prebuilt connectors and application programming interfaces that business users can easily customize to meet their specific needs. This ability creates additional value because the integration of existing systems is crucial to the provision of a unified experience.

3. Reduce Costs and Speed Up Time to Market for Complex Business Models

In a survey conducted by OutSystems, 74% of IT leaders reported that their organizations were able to deliver new applications faster with low-code capabilities, and 69% said that they were able to reduce their backlog of application development projects. Speeding up application development means businesses can reduce costs and accelerate time to market.

Conclusion

By empowering business users with low-code capabilities, organizations can transform customer experience strategies in today’s dynamic and competitive market. By reducing reliance on specialized IT resources, low-code platforms can enable business users to build and adapt applications — and ultimately reduce costs, improve efficiency, and drive innovation.

Partner Spotlight
The Future of Customer Service: Trends to Watch

Haitham Elkhatib,
SVP Growth Markets, Sprinklr

Renowned architect, systems theorist, author, designer, inventor and futurist Buckminster Fuller said, “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”

Partner Spotlight
The Future of Customer Service: Trends to Watch

Haitham Elkhatib,
SVP Growth Markets, Sprinklr


Renowned architect, systems theorist, author, designer, inventor and futurist Buckminster Fuller said, “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”

Customers are, and always will be, the heart of any successful business. Yet nowhere is the stagnation of enterprise technology more evident than how we service and support them. Despite the buzz of digital transformation, it’s shocking to see how similar today’s contact centers are to the contact centers of 10 or 20 years ago.

To truly change the way businesses service customers, I’ve identified four trends that companies can capitalize on to future proof their contact centers.

1) Eliminate a voice-first approach. Many enterprise companies are still stuck with core systems that are decades old. According to some estimates, up to 85% of contact center agent seats are still supported by on-premises solutions that take a voice-first approach. I believe companies will eventually realize that voice-based systems are expensive, inefficient, and deliver a poor customer experience.
2) Shift from reactive to proactive customer service. Next-generation contact-center-as-a-service (CCaaS) solutions don’t wait for a customer’s inbound call. The new model for customer service is proactive, not reactive. Why wait for complaints or even a crisis?
3) Leverage customer data to improve experiences. Contact centers fueled by insights activate a very different model for service and dramatically improve customer experience. Every one-star review can become a prioritized ticket to resolve. Every mean tweet becomes an opportunity to create an advocate.
4) Put AI at the heart of the contact center. AI that is dynamic and trained to learn and grow sits at the heart of a leading contact center. AI powers forward-thinking brands to proactively listen for relevant conversations, to distill and quickly analyze massive volumes of data and insights to engage with customers on the digital channels of their choice.

New Model: Less Service is Better Service

For today’s consumer, the best service is no service. Proactive listening and insights inform product development, marketing, and sales to help address common pain points and eliminate the need for service at all.

The second-best service is findable, self-service help or virtual agents. Trust me, your customer does not want to call you. AI can provide answers to common issues.

When a customer needs an agent’s support, a brand is ready with its third-best option. Agents need a system that captures and preserves the context from any previous interaction — and makes that context readily available so they can move forward with the best resolution.

By taking advantage of new technology trends in the right way, contact centers of the future can shift from being cost centers to revenue drivers.

Partner Spotlight
Breaking the Attack Chain: Proofpoint

Emile Abou Saleh,
Senior Regional Director, Middle East, Turkey and Africa, Proofpoint

We use the term "people-centric" to describe the modern threat landscape and the style of defense required to protect against it. Attackers target people rather than infrastructure, constantly evolving their techniques.

Partner Spotlight
Breaking the Attack Chain: Proofpoint

Emile Abou Saleh,
Senior Regional Director, Middle East, Turkey and Africa, Proofpoint


We use the term "people-centric" to describe the modern threat landscape and the style of defense required to protect against it. Attackers target people rather than infrastructure, constantly evolving their techniques.

Identity theft is now being used by cybercriminals to further their gains. Attackers start by targeting your people through attacks like credential phishing emails and by landing malware. Cybercriminals don’t need to breach the many layers of defenses of an organization. Once they’ve compromised one identity, they’re inside your environment using that identity to move laterally through your organization to achieve their goals of ransomware or data exfiltration. Identity is the new attack surface, and ultimately, your new perimeter.

Every cyberthreat is unique, but most follow a general sequence of steps known as the "attack chain". Understanding the modern attack chain — and how to disrupt it at every stage — can transform your security posture as threats evolve.

Ultimately, the best way to avoid employees falling victim to email-borne threats is to block them from reaching inboxes in the first place. Organizations must recognize the need for strong email security — as most attacks start here.

They must customize their protection around their people not only before an attack, but during and after. Should the initial layer of defense be successfully compromised, organizations must have the tools in place to be able respond instantly and remediate quickly.

Your people also have a huge part to play here. The more they know about the attacks they are likely to face and what to do when they face them, the more likely they are to block them on sight.

When these layers of protection are combined, we can turn the tables on cybercriminals. Now, they have to be right time and time again. Your defenses only need to be right once.

Contact Us

Ronita Bhattacharjee

Vice President - Conferences, IDC Middle East, Africa, & Turkey

+971 4 391 2747

Taher Hamdan

Senior Sales Manager, Conferences, IDC Middle East, Turkey & Africa

+971506591320

About IDC

60 Years
1300 Analysts
110 Countries

International Data Corporation (IDC) is the premier global provider of market intelligence, advisory services, and events for the information technology, telecommunications, and consumer technology markets. With more than 1,300 analysts worldwide, IDC offers global, regional, and local expertise on technology and industry opportunities and trends in over 110 countries. IDC's analysis and insight helps IT professionals, business executives, and the investment community to make fact-based technology decisions and to achieve their key business objectives. Founded in 1964, IDC is a wholly-owned subsidiary of International Data Group (IDG), the world's leading media, data and marketing services company. To learn more about IDC, please visit www.idc.com.