Explore other IDC events

IDC West Africa CIO Summit 2024

The Future of IT: Rethinking Digitalization for an AI Everywhere World

Lagos Marriott Hotel Ikeja, Nigeria

The Future of IT: Rethinking Digitalization for an AI Everywhere World

Overview

Amid global tensions, power shortages, and the struggle to rebound in the post-COVID era, Africa’s CIOs are finding lifelines in digitization. They are turning to technology to transform their businesses, improve efficiency, and empower workforces. They are also showing strong interest in emerging technologies such as AI. In fact, many leading organizations in Sub-Saharan Africa are already exploring and investing in generative AI (GenAI) use cases.

In this context, IDC believes that organizations need to be ready for an "AI Everywhere" world in the future. IDC forecasts that annual spending on AI-centric systems worldwide will surpass $300 billion by 2026, while ICT spending in Sub-Saharan Africa will exceed $110 billion by 2027.

In the era of GenAI-driven disruption, technology leaders are reassessing AI's pivotal role in the digitalization landscape. Given AI’s transformative power to significantly enhance digital innovation, customer experiences, operational efficiency, and sustainability, forward-thinking governments and digitally-driven organizations are adopting an ‘AI everywhere’ mindset and making AI a tech agenda priority to maintain competitive parity with early adopters.

As a result, today’s IT leaders increasingly find themselves in multidimensional, strategic, and collaborative roles in which reporting structures and mandates have evolved and risen in prominence. These new roles also have greater responsibilities. As it increasingly gets embedded in services, products, and experiences, AI will inevitably become intertwined with the lives of employees, customers, partners, and society at large. Indeed, AI will be everywhere — underpinning areas such as performance, growth, engagement, satisfaction, safety, security, governance, privacy, sustainability, ethics, wellbeing, payments, and more.

CIOs and IT leaders need to prepare their organizations for an "AI Everywhere" future. They must focus on building data-centric platforms, migrating workloads to cloud infrastructure, governing the economics of cloud, redefining security and digital trust, and investing in skills.

The IDC West Africa CIO Summit 2024 will provide an essential platform for empowering IT leaders. It will help leaders better understand their new roles in today's AI-infused landscape and deliver expert guidance on achieving success while crafting innovative solutions for current and emerging challenges. Join us as we discuss a multitude of hot topics, trends, and challenges, providing technology leaders with the critical insights they require to adapt to shifting business landscapes, forge new business models, and scale massively in today’s dynamic digital economy.


Why Attend?

New Perspectives
Assess the progress of your team or your organization's growth while discovering what to do to correct common mistakes.

Professional Development
Learn new leadership skills that will set you apart and help you to advance in your career.

Peer-to-Peer Insights
Participate in immersive networking exercises and engage with your fellow leaders over lunch and dinner.

Persuasive Communication Techniques
Discover how to get you what you want when you need it.

New Product Offerings
Enhance your tech stack and strategy with exclusive access to the very latest services and solutions.


Key Themes

AI Everywhere

Digital Business strategies

Digital Economy Trends

Data Platforms for the Intelligent Enterprise

Data-driven Customer Experience (CX) Transformation

Future of Work

Digital Trust and Security

Industry 4.0

Sustainability

Future of Digital Infrastructure

Software Innovation and Modern App Dev

Venue

Lagos Marriott Hotel Ikeja

122 Joel Ogunnaike St, Ikeja GRA 100271, Lagos, Nigeria

Speakers

Want to become a speaker?

Agenda

Filter Topics

Tuesday May 21, 2024
8:30

Registration & Networking

9:25

Opening Act

9:30

IDC Welcome Address

9:35

Opening Keynote:Government Affiliation

9:50

IDC Opening Keynote: Rethinking Digitalization for an AI-first World

10:20

Unleashing Digital Business Growth: The Power of Automation in IT, Processes, and Value Streams

10:40

Navigating the Clouds: Strategies for Cross-Cloud Data Management

Q&A (Ask Questions & Stand a Chance to Win Raffle Prizes)

11:00

From Migration to Mastery: West Africa's Approach to Hybrid and Multicloud

Q&A (Ask Questions & Stand a Chance to Win Raffle Prizes)

11:20

Unlocking Business Value: A Pragmatic Approach to AIOps Adoption

Q&A (Ask Questions & Stand a Chance to Win Raffle Prizes)

11:40

Tea/Coffee & Networking Break

Welcome Back Raffle

12:05

Transforming Business DNA: Scaling Automation in Digital Infrastructure

Q&A (Ask Questions & Stand a Chance to Win Raffle Prizes)

12:25

The Need for Speed: Accelerating Infrastructure Transformation

Q&A (Ask Questions & Stand a Chance to Win Raffle Prizes)

12:45

From Transformation to Digital Dominance: The New Era of Business

Q&A (Ask Questions & Stand a Chance to Win Raffle Prizes)

13:05

Platinum Tracks (Parallel Sessions)

14:00

Lunch & Networking

14:50

Technology Focus Session (Parallel Sessions)

15:45

For The CIO- By The CIO Tracks (Parallel Sessions)

16:20

Close of Summit

Partners

Want to become a partner?

Technology Focus Group Partner

Knowledge Hub

Analyst Spotlight
Enabling Security Outcomes with Artificial Intelligence

Frank Dickson,
Group Vice President, Security & Trust, IDC

ChatGPT launched to the world on November 30, 2022. Based on a large language model, it enabled users have interactive “conversations” with the AI-enabled software and unlock the riches buried in data stores. Microsoft Security Copilot, Google Cloud Security AI Workbench, AWS Titan/Bedrock, and IBM watsonx only served to intensify the buzz. As of the beginning of 2024, many vendors have enriched their products with generative AI (GenAI).



Analyst Spotlight
Enabling Security Outcomes with Artificial Intelligence

Frank Dickson,
Group Vice President, Security & Trust, IDC


ChatGPT launched to the world on November 30, 2022. Based on a large language model, it enabled users have interactive “conversations” with the AI-enabled software and unlock the riches buried in data stores. Microsoft Security Copilot, Google Cloud Security AI Workbench, AWS Titan/Bedrock, and IBM watsonx only served to intensify the buzz. As of the beginning of 2024, many vendors have enriched their products with generative AI (GenAI).

AI in security is hardly new. Analytics have been the foundation of cybersecurity since the very beginning. Machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence found some of their early commercial applications in cybersecurity. Think about it. Symantec first used AI to develop malware signatures in 2003. Products like McAfee Deep Defender, FireEye Malware Protection System, and Cisco Advanced Malware Protection were launched more than 10 years ago!

As vendors look to differentiate their offerings and appeal to sophisticated, knowledgeable, and astute cybersecurity buyers, marketers commonly promote buzzwords. Yet buzzwords are seldom defined and rarely have a shared meaning among practitioners in the industry. The result is confusion.

IDC does not want to contribute to the confusion. There is some general guidance that IDC would recommend that CISOs, CIOs, and security professionals consider before shifting to domain-specific treatments:

1. Focus on the benefit, no matter what AI is.
2. Start with an outcome in mind.
3. Note that transparency is now more important than ever.
4. Create decision trees.
5. Demand low code, no code, or natural language processing (NLP).

IDC's West Africa CIO Summit looks to address security in this new GenAI reality. We aim to guide you in working with the CEO and Board of Directors as we transition to delivering secure outcomes and a trusted organization to our executive constituencies.

Analyst Spotlight
The ESG Imperative: Building Blocks for Data-Driven Sustainability Transformation

Eren Eser,
Associate Research Director, Research (META), IDC

The United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development provides a shared blueprint for sustainable global development aimed at improving human lives and protecting the environment, and calls for urgent action by both developed and developing countries. In addition to the actions taken by countries, organizations also need to take urgent, serious steps toward sustainability.

Analyst Spotlight
The ESG Imperative: Building Blocks for Data-Driven Sustainability Transformation

Eren Eser,
Associate Research Director, Research (META), IDC


The United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development provides a shared blueprint for sustainable global development aimed at improving human lives and protecting the environment, and calls for urgent action by both developed and developing countries. In addition to the actions taken by countries, organizations also need to take urgent, serious steps toward sustainability. A recent IDC survey focused on sustainability maturity identified 42% of organizations worldwide as "sustainability mainstreamers," sitting right in the middle of the maturity curve, which spans from "just getting started" to full sustainability "visionaries" (source: IDC's Sustainability Readiness Survey, 2023). This represents an improvement compared with surveys from just a couple of years ago, where about three-quarters of respondents sat within the first maturity stage (i.e., conducting first materiality assessments and setting long-term targets).

Despite these recent improvements, organizations continue to struggle to collect and report investment-grade data from across their value chains. They are also only making slow progress regarding the organizational and cultural changes that are necessary to succeed on their transformation journeys and fully realize the potential financial and non-financial benefits related to corporate sustainability. Given the urgency to act and the broadening landscape of available IT products and ESG business services, sustainability leaders need to make informed purchasing decisions so they can effectively invest their budgets in solutions that yield a measurable ROI and help them move from ESG box checking into the operationalization phase.

There are three principal components of a sustainability management program: record, report, and respond. At present, the majority of organizations are in the first two categories, focusing on the collection and sharing of ESG-related data. However, a growing number of companies are maturing to the next stage of response and are leveraging the data that is collected to develop their strategies around sustainability improvements.

ESG management is not a point-in-time exercise but an ongoing process that requires a platform that can automate a continued influx of data and leverage that data to drive performance evaluation. Organizations are leveraging ESG platforms to essentially walk the organization along the path of ESG program development, and thus, once a sustainability strategy is established, these solutions can then be leveraged to track performance. As organizations are being judged on their ability to meet stated ESG goals (in terms of both public opinion and legislation), understanding progress on the path to that goal is essential. Platforms that can automate data ingestion and map to specific KPIs help organizations keep track of these goals and create alerts when performance falls short. They can also potentially provide insights on actions to take to remain on course.

Developing a sustainable society is an obligation that all governments and industry leaders must shoulder, and sustainability transformation provides an opportunity that must be seized without delay. Today, digital transformation and sustainability transformation have a crucial factor in common — both have become essential to organizations' core operations. And technology has a crucial role to play in helping organizations to augment the sustainability transformation process.

Analyst Spotlight
From eGovernment to Invisible Government

Massimiliano Claps,
Research Director, IDC

Orienting government services around people is not a new aspiration, but with rapid technological advances and rising societal expectations, senior public sector leaders in West Africa and beyond are re-imagining how to deliver on that promise.

Analyst Spotlight
From eGovernment to Invisible Government

Massimiliano Claps,
Research Director, IDC


Orienting government services around people is not a new aspiration, but with rapid technological advances and rising societal expectations, senior public sector leaders in the Middle East and beyond are re-imagining how to deliver on that promise.

Since the inception of egovernment in the early 2000s (later also known as smart government and digital government), digital channels became critical for improving citizen (government-to-citizen) and business (government-to-business) experience, attracting investors and tourists, and enhancing collaboration across government entities. In the Middle East, egovernment initiatives yielded remarkable results in terms of operational efficiency, citizen convenience, and engagement with constituents. In fact, Saudi Arabia’s ranking in the UN eGovernment Index jumped from 105 to 31 in just 20 years, whereas the UAE rose from 38th to 13th position over the same period. Notwithstanding this amazing progress, the outcomes of technology investments by governments sometimes fell below expectations due to siloed processes and systems. People and businesses were forced to experience time-consuming bureaucratic services, and access to egovernment services remained unequal.

Senior public sector leaders that aim to usher in the next generation of people-centric services should make efforts to understand individual and business needs and circumstances through the intelligent use of data. By simplifying and merging services across programs, partnering with the private sector, making digital services more inclusive, and enabling trusted interactions, they can make the government machine truly “invisible”.

Reimagining Service Delivery, Operating, and Trust Models

To make government invisible, technology-powered innovation must be embraced to deliver seamless services to empowered people and businesses:

Service Delivery Model. The next generation of invisible government services will be seamless. Future constituents (citizens, businesses, investors, tourists, etc.) will not realize that public services are actively being delivered. They will not be asked to interact with the government to know what services they are entitled to or be interrupted in their daily routine because they receive requests to provide data or prove a change in their circumstances.

Operating Model. The next generation of invisible government operations will be proactive. Without disrupting people's and businesses' daily activities, the government will know enough to understand the events that impact constituents and change their circumstances. Governments will proactively register constituents to relevant entitlement programs and automatically deliver services.

Trust Model. The next generation of invisible government will shift from an enforcement to an empowerment focus. Instead of enforcing compliance after a violation, the government will make compliance easy for constituents through automated, proactive services and simplified regulations. The government will invest in digital trust through transparent, personalized notifications and tools that visualize how personal data is used across departments.

The Road to Invisible Government

To accelerate the journey toward invisible government, senior public sector leaders should implement changes based around six building blocks:

1. Building a holistic view of people, businesses, cities, and communities. Governments should invest in building a 360⁰ view of people, businesses, cities, and communities. By doing so, they can avoid intrusions into people’s daily lives (as they will not have to ask for the same data again and again). Moreover, they can understand when changes in circumstances offer opportunities to proactively deliver services; they can also empower open engagements on matters that are relevant to constituents.

2. Scaling cognitive processes and services. Governments need to re-engineer processes and systems to recognize changes in the circumstances of their constituents and identify their root causes. Via re-engineering, they can also trigger operational workflows or dynamically reconfigure services and programs to satisfy evolving constituent needs and preferences (e.g., by embedding AI-enabled cognitive capabilities into applications, processes, and services).

3. Designing and delivering people-centric experiences. Instead of scrolling through different screens or filling in multiple forms, people increasingly expect to interact with systems via conversational interfaces that can recognize their languages, accents, and tones of voice. Cognitive capabilities need to be embedded into every touchpoint throughout a user experience journey.

4. Ensuring accessibility and inclusion for all. The non-intrusive and proactive nature of invisible government will enhance inclusion by lowering accessibility barriers. As conversational and generative AI tools and immersive reality solutions become more pervasive, they must be designed with accessibility in mind.

5. Investing in next-generation trust services. To boost trust in invisible government, public sector leaders should invest in tools that enable citizens to conveniently access digital services across departments, directorates, agencies, levels of government, and potentially the private sector, all without having to remember multiple login credentials. These tools will help citizens keep their personal information up to date and allow governments to seamlessly access such information.

6. Expanding collaboration with third parties. Even with the best will and organization possible, public authorities cannot make invisible government a reality by themselves. Public leaders are thus working with private enterprises and community organizations to minimize constituent interactions with the government, eliminate duplicate requests for personal data, and offer the best possible convenience and proximity when interactions are needed (e.g., through banks, insurance agencies, grocery stores, and post offices).

By joining the 2024 West Africa CIO Summit, attendees will have an opportunity to exchange ideas, revisit policies, and learn how to adapt organizational capacity and competencies. They will discover how to make invisible government by working with the public ecosystem and ensuring public trust.

Analyst Spotlight
Optimizing Infrastructure for the GenAI Era

Matt Eastwood,
Enterprise Infrastructure & Datacenter, IDC

The integration of artificial intelligence (AI) into IT infrastructure is a transformative event, ushering in a new era for IT management and strategy. This change compels IT leaders to reconsider their conventional IT frameworks and adopt innovative technology paradigms. Central to this transformation is the need to advance data models and manage workloads effectively across diverse environments, including edge computing, core datacenters, and hybrid cloud systems.

Analyst Spotlight
Optimizing Infrastructure for the GenAI Era

Matt Eastwood,
SVP, Enterprise Infrastructure & Datacenter, IDC


The integration of artificial intelligence (AI) into IT infrastructure is a transformative event, ushering in a new era for IT management and strategy. This change compels IT leaders to reconsider their conventional IT frameworks and adopt innovative technology paradigms. Central to this transformation is the need to advance data models and manage workloads effectively across diverse environments, including edge computing, core datacenters, and hybrid cloud systems.

AI's incorporation into IT operations necessitates a fundamental reevaluation of how workloads are distributed and managed. IT leaders are now tasked with optimizing cloud operations, a key component of which involves leveraging AI to improve efficiency and performance. Moreover, the shift toward AI integration increases the importance of sustainable IT practices. In an age where environmental impact is a critical concern, developing energy-efficient AI systems that align with corporate ethical standards is imperative.

The resilience and adaptability of IT infrastructure are vital in this dynamic landscape. As AI technologies continue to evolve, IT systems must be designed to be flexible and robust, capable of adapting to new advancements and challenges. This approach not only enhances current operations but also sets the stage for future innovations in IT infrastructure that is further influenced by AI.

Additionally, the role of AI in automating and optimizing IT processes cannot be overstated. By harnessing AI, IT leaders can achieve greater operational efficiency, reduce human error, and provide more personalized and responsive IT services. This leads to a more proactive IT management style, where predictive analytics and machine learning algorithms anticipate issues and needs, leading to preemptive solutions. Furthermore, the ethical and security aspects of AI in IT infrastructure are critical. As AI systems become more sophisticated, ensuring data privacy, ethical AI use, and robust security protocols is essential. IT leaders must navigate these complexities while fostering an environment of innovation and growth.

In summary, the advent of AI in IT infrastructure is a watershed moment, signaling a paradigm shift in how IT is managed and executed. It requires a holistic approach, blending advanced technology, sustainability, ethics, and resilience, to fully harness the potential of AI in revolutionizing IT operations and strategies. This shift is not just about adopting modern technologies, but about reimagining the role of IT in a rapidly evolving digital landscape.

Analyst Spotlight
Generative AI Will Transform the Software Development Life Cycle

Michele Rosen,
PhD, Research Manager, IDC


Generative AI (GenAI) has dominated the tech conversation since OpenAI's release of ChatGPT in late 2022. According to IDC's GenAI Awareness, Readiness, and Commitment (ARC) Survey (August 2023), C-level leaders in most organizations are already driving significant investment in GenAI capabilities across the enterprise, including customer-facing applications, decision support applications, and employee applications.

Analyst Spotlight
Generative AI Will Transform the Software Development Life Cycle

Michele Rosen,
PhD, Research Manager, IDC


Generative AI (GenAI) has dominated the tech conversation since OpenAI's release of ChatGPT in late 2022. According to IDC's GenAI Awareness, Readiness, and Commitment (ARC) Survey (August 2023), C-level leaders in most organizations are already driving significant investment in GenAI capabilities across the enterprise, including customer-facing applications, decision support applications, and employee applications.

GenAI's extraordinary capabilities have raised questions about the future of work. Knowledge workers, including technical professionals, wonder which of their responsibilities can be performed more efficiently and effectively by this new technology. Indeed, IDC predicts that GenAI will dramatically transform the software development life cycle (SDLC):

• By 2026, 40% of net-new applications will be intelligent apps, where developers incorporate AI to enhance existing experiences and form new use cases; this maturation of GenAI technologies will catalyze accelerated growth of the world's developer population and cause the world's developer population to grow 1.5x faster.

• By 2028, natural language will become the most widely used programming language, with developers using it to create 55% of net-new applications and 80% of software tests (IDC FutureScape: Worldwide Developer and DevOps 2024 Predictions).

Although GenAI will be able to perform many technical tasks, organizational adoption of GenAI will require new custom development and new technical skills such as prompt crafting and engineering, the curation of the agents and actions that enable AI assistants to execute tasks, and the ability to evaluate and fine-tune models for specific use cases. Organizations must therefore ensure that developers have the new tools, platforms, and infrastructure they need to make GenAI opportunities a reality, such as prompt crafting interfaces, experimental sandboxes, tools for building the skills and actions that enable AI assistants to act, and interfaces for selecting, evaluating, grounding, and fine-tuning foundation models.

Given the rapid adoption of GenAI, it's not surprising that less than half of organizations investing significantly in generative AI have implemented governance processes such as a GenAI Center of Excellence, use and ethics guidelines, and employee training programs, according to IDC's GenAI ARC Survey. One way to facilitate governance is to leverage the GenAI capabilities that software vendors are adding to low-code and no-code development platforms. These platforms have been providing governance tools for both technical and non-technical employees for years, and so they could become the center of gravity for distributing and managing GenAI capabilities throughout the organization and for enabling employees to build their own apps, thereby increasing their productivity and enabling innovation.

IDC West Africa Advisory Council 2024

Contact Us

Theresa Etukodo Eshiet

Senior Events Manager, META Events

+234 802 335 6732

George Changunda

Senior Sales Manager

IDC, Foundry

IT executives rely on IDC and Foundry events for discovering new ideas, trends, and solutions that drive their technology strategies. Leveraging IDC’s deep market intelligence and advisory expertise, and Foundry’s rich media brands (CIO, Computerworld, InfoWorld) and relationships, IDC and Foundry produce powerful learning and networking experiences for IT decision makers around the world.